Madrone of Blades
XV Molten Iron
XIX The Sun Ten of Coils
Three of Spikes
Five of Coils
Madrone of Bells III The Forge
Two of Bells
XVII The Star Star Spread
XVII - THE STAR
The Three Star Spread is based on this picture. One woman stands on iron ore and watches a basket star swimming in the sea. Another woman stands on fossil crinoids (relatives of the sea star) and watches a falling iron meteor. Each woman tries to attract the other's attention, though they do not look at each other. A single glowing eye unites the women, their visions, and the ground they stand on.

This layout is used to clarify a relationship between two people. Odd numbers represent one person, even numbers represent the other. Card 9 unites the two. Try reading both sides for each person. The spread can also be read for one person: Odd numbers represent what you think and do in the world and how others see you. Even numbers represent the subconscious, the imagination, and how you see yourself. Card 9 balances the two.

Cards 1&2: The ground that each person stands on: home and work, responsibilities, and the past as it affects the current situation.
Cards 3&4: Each person now: priorities, self image, role in life or in the relationship.
Cards 5&6: What each person is looking at next and/or wants the other person to see.
Cards 7&8: Division: an inner obstacle or outside interference.
Card 9: Point of connection or reconciliation.

Two of Bells: Tiny gongs or cymbals joined with a riveted chain give a hard, clear ring. A collaborative project or moving balance between opposites that strikes a new note to awaken anyone who is watching.
XV - Molten Iron (The Devil): She stands on iron that melts except where her hands cool it into coils, and stares into a mesmerizing pool of molten iron. A giant desert centipede crawls up her back, symbol of rising uncontrolled energy. If she masters the temptation of fear, she gains power and does not place others in bondage to her weakness.
III - The Forge (The Empress): The forge is a pomegranate filled with fiery seeds of life, the inexhaustible womb of creativity, a comfort and a challenge that draws the smith back again and again. With each piece of iron it heats, the world is new.
Madrone of Blades: Water of Air. Crowned with madrone leaves, she holds an owl feather pen and a knife for cutting reeds to make papyrus and a gourd reed pipe. She is a record-keeper and the source of the River that flows between worlds. Her wisdom and tight emotional control are hard-won, but she willingly shares her learning and clear thoughts.
Ten of Coils: A chain of interlocking snails becomes more than the sum of its links, and conjures a new growing spirit-snail that is the essence of its wholeness.
Five of Coils: A broken high-carbon steel chain of brittle stars surrounds a living brittle star with a broken arm. This steel shatters if quenched, and must be cooled in sand for strength. When something feels too fragile to work with, stress must be relieved slowly. Before giving up or remaking what is broken, touch the wisdom in the break.
Madrone of Bells: Water of Earth. Under madrone berries in a mammoth shrine, she transforms cave pearls into bells and shelters a wolf and a dog puppy. She is a generous provider, watching to see that everyone has enough, enjoying the abundance of production work, and makes her home everywhere.
XIX - The Sun: She stands under a flaming iron sunwheel, absorbing its brightness until she begins to glow and become a sun herself. She makes a door for others in the red curtain of flame, and controls her own crackling black blaze and cool white glow at will.
Three of Spikes: Three mystical lamps: a basket twist with a lightning bug, a smoking oil-filled quartz crystal, and a glowing fluorescent geode on a braided spike. They reveal inspiration from an unexplained or unknowable source, creativity as magic or madness.

Online Free Reading from the Ironwing Tarot by Lorena Babcock Moore.
www.mineralarts.com

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All artwork, electronic images, and text are copyright ©2001-2004 by Lorena Babcock Moore. Script copyright ©2004 by Daniel Moore.